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{"id":1396528644147,"title":"The True Story of Kaluaikoolau As Told by His Wife, Piilani","handle":"50093","description":"\u003cp\u003eTranslated from the Hawaiian language by Frances N. Frazier.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eThe story of Kaluaikoolau's last years, as narrated by his devoted wife, Piilani, was published in Hawaiian in 1906. In this volume, the Hawaiian text is preceded by an English translation that successfully retains the poetic imagery and figurative language of the original. Many writers have attempted to tell Kaluaikoolau's story, but none have been able to match the simple grace and poignancy of Piilani's narrative. It is one of only a handful of historical accounts by a native Hawaiian.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eThe story of Kaluaikoolau (or Koolau) is one of Kauai's great legends. A native of Waimea, Koolau was a cowboy, an expert shot and roper, well liked and respected. In 1892, after learning that he and his young son had contacted leprosy, Koolau fled with his family deep into Kalalau Valley. The remote valley had become a refuge for Hawaiians afflicted with leprosy — rather than endure forced separation from their loved ones, a few dozen men and women managed to avoid capture and live in hiding with the help of friends and family. In June 1893 Koolau shot and killed a sheriff and two Provisional Government soldiers who had been sent to arrest him. He vowed never to be taken alive and became a powerful symbol of resistance for many Hawaiians in the years following the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani. Koolau died and was buried in Kalalau Valley in 1896.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eSoft cover. 141 pages. 6 inches by 9 inches.\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2018-08-15T12:32:11-10:00","created_at":"2018-08-15T12:32:12-10:00","vendor":"Pacific Historic Parks Bookstore","type":"BOOKS","tags":["All","Books \u0026 Media","Hawaii Books","Kalaupapa","Our Parks_Kalaupapa (Molokai)"],"price":1995,"price_min":1995,"price_max":1995,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":1995,"compare_at_price_min":1995,"compare_at_price_max":1995,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":12626607145011,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"50093","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"The True Story of Kaluaikoolau As Told by His Wife, Piilani","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":1995,"weight":255,"compare_at_price":1995,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":"9780970329301"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0010\/8232\/7091\/products\/50093.jpg?v=1562370491"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0010\/8232\/7091\/products\/50093.jpg?v=1562370491","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eTranslated from the Hawaiian language by Frances N. Frazier.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eThe story of Kaluaikoolau's last years, as narrated by his devoted wife, Piilani, was published in Hawaiian in 1906. In this volume, the Hawaiian text is preceded by an English translation that successfully retains the poetic imagery and figurative language of the original. Many writers have attempted to tell Kaluaikoolau's story, but none have been able to match the simple grace and poignancy of Piilani's narrative. It is one of only a handful of historical accounts by a native Hawaiian.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eThe story of Kaluaikoolau (or Koolau) is one of Kauai's great legends. A native of Waimea, Koolau was a cowboy, an expert shot and roper, well liked and respected. In 1892, after learning that he and his young son had contacted leprosy, Koolau fled with his family deep into Kalalau Valley. The remote valley had become a refuge for Hawaiians afflicted with leprosy — rather than endure forced separation from their loved ones, a few dozen men and women managed to avoid capture and live in hiding with the help of friends and family. In June 1893 Koolau shot and killed a sheriff and two Provisional Government soldiers who had been sent to arrest him. He vowed never to be taken alive and became a powerful symbol of resistance for many Hawaiians in the years following the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani. Koolau died and was buried in Kalalau Valley in 1896.\u003c\/p\u003e\r\n\u003cp\u003eSoft cover. 141 pages. 6 inches by 9 inches.\u003c\/p\u003e"}

The True Story of Kaluaikoolau As Told by His Wife, Piilani

Product Description

Translated from the Hawaiian language by Frances N. Frazier.

The story of Kaluaikoolau's last years, as narrated by his devoted wife, Piilani, was published in Hawaiian in 1906. In this volume, the Hawaiian text is preceded by an English translation that successfully retains the poetic imagery and figurative language of the original. Many writers have attempted to tell Kaluaikoolau's story, but none have been able to match the simple grace and poignancy of Piilani's narrative. It is one of only a handful of historical accounts by a native Hawaiian.

The story of Kaluaikoolau (or Koolau) is one of Kauai's great legends. A native of Waimea, Koolau was a cowboy, an expert shot and roper, well liked and respected. In 1892, after learning that he and his young son had contacted leprosy, Koolau fled with his family deep into Kalalau Valley. The remote valley had become a refuge for Hawaiians afflicted with leprosy — rather than endure forced separation from their loved ones, a few dozen men and women managed to avoid capture and live in hiding with the help of friends and family. In June 1893 Koolau shot and killed a sheriff and two Provisional Government soldiers who had been sent to arrest him. He vowed never to be taken alive and became a powerful symbol of resistance for many Hawaiians in the years following the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani. Koolau died and was buried in Kalalau Valley in 1896.

Soft cover. 141 pages. 6 inches by 9 inches.

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