{"id":1623782916147,"title":"F4U Corsair Matted Illustration Print 11.75\" x 19.25\"","handle":"100141","description":"Our F4U Corsair Print is a matted illustration that will please any diehard fan. This particular F4U Corsair #56 \"Sunsetter\" belongs to the Smithsonian National Air \u0026amp; Space Museum and can be seen at the Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington, D.C. Matted print of artist Doug Kinsley's aviation illustration. Measures 11.75\" x 19.25\". \u003cb\u003eHistory of the F4U Corsair\u003c\/b\u003e The F4U Corsair was the first single seat fighter to exceed 400 MPH in 1940. Chance Vought's new design would go on to be the best Marine Corps fighter of the Second World War. Named the \"Bent Wing Bird\" by the American Navy and Marines, the Japanese had another name for it, the \"Whistling Death\". The US Navy proceeded with carrier trials as early as 1942. However, visibility and landing characteristics delayed deployment until late 1944. The Marines loved their Corsairs because they were faster than the F6F Hellcat and able to carry heavier bomb loads. F4U's were used extensively during the island hopping campaigns and amphibious landings. The most famous outfit flying the Corsair was VMF-214, the \"Black Sheep\", commanded by Major Gregory \"Pappy\" Boyington from the Solomon Islands. Numerous Medal of Honor recipients also flew the Corsair. The F4U in this lithograph is of Marine Fighter Squadron VF-113, the \"Whistling Devils\", while assigned to Engebi Island in 1944.","published_at":"2018-12-05T02:00:18-10:00","created_at":"2018-12-05T12:00:10-10:00","vendor":"Pacific Historic Parks Bookstore","type":"Printed Material","tags":["All","Artwork","Made in the USA","Planes","Posters \u0026 Prints"],"price":2500,"price_min":2500,"price_max":2500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":2500,"compare_at_price_min":2500,"compare_at_price_max":2500,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":15847636926515,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"100141","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"F4U Corsair Matted Illustration Print 11.75\" x 19.25\"","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":2500,"weight":227,"compare_at_price":2500,"inventory_management":"shopify","barcode":"758475346900"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0010\/8232\/7091\/products\/F4U_Corsair_16x9_web.jpg?v=1544047672"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0010\/8232\/7091\/products\/F4U_Corsair_16x9_web.jpg?v=1544047672","options":["Title"],"content":"Our F4U Corsair Print is a matted illustration that will please any diehard fan. This particular F4U Corsair #56 \"Sunsetter\" belongs to the Smithsonian National Air \u0026amp; Space Museum and can be seen at the Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington, D.C. Matted print of artist Doug Kinsley's aviation illustration. Measures 11.75\" x 19.25\". \u003cb\u003eHistory of the F4U Corsair\u003c\/b\u003e The F4U Corsair was the first single seat fighter to exceed 400 MPH in 1940. Chance Vought's new design would go on to be the best Marine Corps fighter of the Second World War. Named the \"Bent Wing Bird\" by the American Navy and Marines, the Japanese had another name for it, the \"Whistling Death\". The US Navy proceeded with carrier trials as early as 1942. However, visibility and landing characteristics delayed deployment until late 1944. The Marines loved their Corsairs because they were faster than the F6F Hellcat and able to carry heavier bomb loads. F4U's were used extensively during the island hopping campaigns and amphibious landings. The most famous outfit flying the Corsair was VMF-214, the \"Black Sheep\", commanded by Major Gregory \"Pappy\" Boyington from the Solomon Islands. Numerous Medal of Honor recipients also flew the Corsair. The F4U in this lithograph is of Marine Fighter Squadron VF-113, the \"Whistling Devils\", while assigned to Engebi Island in 1944."}

F4U Corsair Matted Illustration Print 11.75" x 19.25"

Product Description
Our F4U Corsair Print is a matted illustration that will please any diehard fan. This particular F4U Corsair #56 "Sunsetter" belongs to the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum and can be seen at the Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington, D.C. Matted print of artist Doug Kinsley's aviation illustration. Measures 11.75" x 19.25". History of the F4U Corsair The F4U Corsair was the first single seat fighter to exceed 400 MPH in 1940. Chance Vought's new design would go on to be the best Marine Corps fighter of the Second World War. Named the "Bent Wing Bird" by the American Navy and Marines, the Japanese had another name for it, the "Whistling Death". The US Navy proceeded with carrier trials as early as 1942. However, visibility and landing characteristics delayed deployment until late 1944. The Marines loved their Corsairs because they were faster than the F6F Hellcat and able to carry heavier bomb loads. F4U's were used extensively during the island hopping campaigns and amphibious landings. The most famous outfit flying the Corsair was VMF-214, the "Black Sheep", commanded by Major Gregory "Pappy" Boyington from the Solomon Islands. Numerous Medal of Honor recipients also flew the Corsair. The F4U in this lithograph is of Marine Fighter Squadron VF-113, the "Whistling Devils", while assigned to Engebi Island in 1944.
$25.00
Maximum quantity available reached.